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How Canadians are coping: A coast-to-coast economic report from Canadian Business Magazine

March 26, 2009

News Releases
From Halifax to Oshawa and Saskatoon to Prince George, pockets of hope
    persist amid recession gloomTORONTO, March 26 /CNW/ - The Canadian economy is poised to contract by
1.2% this year. Or is it 1.4%? Or maybe it's 3%. Such varied and constantly
shifting forecasts are useful only up to a point: the recession is affecting
Canadians in ways that statistics cannot show. What's really going on out
there?
    Canadian Business sent staff writer Joe Castaldo to visit seven cities in
seven days, from one end of the country to the other, to find out how
businesses and workers are dealing with the worst downturn in decades. What
emerges is a series of snapshots of the concerns and struggles of Canadians.
Some are fearful, others cautiously optimistic. And not all say they are
hurting. But even those happy few say the recession is very much on their
minds-and they worry whatever relative prosperity they may be enjoying could
be short-lived.So what mood did we find in our communities?

    -   Stephenville, Nfld.: Where local business failed, the oilsands have
        provided. But for how long?

    -   Halifax: In oil and hedge funds we trust-FOR NOW.

    -   Oshawa, Ont.: The new reality includes plant closings, unemployment.

    -   Portage la Prairie, Man.: There is some security in the bounty of the
        land.

    -   Saskatoon: In a province with a relatively robust economy, many are
        betting the good times will last.

    -   Yellowknife: Financing for exploration has dried up, and the diamond
        industry is just trying to hang on.

    -   Prince George, B.C.: Where the downturn hits hard, there are pleas to
        "give these people a break."PLUS: A special report on Fort McMurray, which is playing catch-up until
the oilpatch revs up again.

    For much more on each of these communities, see this week's issue of
Canadian Business magazine, on newsstands beginning March 26.

    About Canadian Business magazine:

    Founded in 1928, Canadian Business is the longest-serving, best-selling
and most trusted business publication in Canada. Canadian Business stands
alone as the business magazine in Canada with 100% paid circulation. With a
readership of more that one million, the magazine is published every second
Monday, except in January, July and August, when monthly issues are published.
Special annual issues of Canadian Business include the Investor 500, the MBA
Guide, the Rich 100 and the Best and Worst Boards. Visit
www.canadianbusiness.com.